Life experiences · Teen Pregnancy · Writer

I Am A Published Author!

After six months of starting the self publishing process, I pushed the button to accept my cover and manuscript for publication.The_Total_Deconstruc_Cover_for_Kindle
The Total Deconstruction of Chloe Wilson is a straight-forward memoir about my teen pregnancy. The book is a great resource for teen girls, counselors, and parents of teen girls. I wrote this book to help teenage girls who suffer with low self-esteem to choose their youth  and learn to be happy with who they are. I needed a boyfriend to feel good about myself. That mindset led to my eventual deconstruction and teen pregnancy. Topics addressed in the book include self-esteem, date rape, suicide, and teen pregnancy.  Statistics and consequences of teen pregnancy are provided with a clear view of the risks involved for the mother and child.

I would encourage all teen girls, especially those at-risk, to read this book.

“My legs traded off, jiggling to my high level of anxiety.

I shifted in my chair–comfort eluded me.

On one side, the school nurse.

on the other sat Sarah. She looked eerily calm.

The attending nurse walked into the waiting room with the results tucked in her hand. I jumped  out of my seat. Only a few feet away stood this woman in a smiley-face smock and she was holding my future…

‘I have good news,’ she said, ‘and bad news.’ She looked at my friend. ‘Sarah, you are not pregnant.’ Then, turning to me, she delivered the verdict without leniency.

‘Chloe, you definitely are.'” Excerpt from The Total Deconstruction of Chloe Wilson

“2000 teen girls in the US get pregnant every day.” stayteen.org

The link to my book on Amazon.com:

http://www.amazon.com/The-Total-Deconstruction-Chloe-Wilson/dp/1492750263/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1391310277&sr=8-1&keywords=the+total+deconstruction+of+chloe+wilson

Life experiences · Teen Pregnancy

Patience is…

Growing up in a large, religious family, patience was a common topic.  Born the fifth of nine children, I learned to wait my turn to use the telephone, shower, and go to the bathroom. My parents taught that patience truly was a virtue, and good things come to those who wait. They also used the word endure a lot.

While my personality was quiet and I seemed like the obedient type, I hated both those words.  Patience equaled going without, endure meant to suffer. I didn’t plan on doing either one. Instant gratification on the road of least resistance lured me into a world of lying and deceit. And without a second thought I ran over anyone who got in my way. Friends who didn’t propel me into my idea of popularity were trampled under. My values, beliefs, morals…they only dragged me down and kept me from having fun, so I cut them loose too.

And that’s how I came to be a scared fifteen-year-old girl, standing in front of my mother with head lowered–my shame so heavy I couldn’t bear to look her in the eyes.

“Mom, I’m pregnant.”

I was in such a hurry to grow up that I got exactly what I wanted. So what did I learn about patience? I’ll agree that it is a virtue, but I like another definition better. In the words of a wise 92-year-old woman,

“Patience is…a virgin!”

Life experiences · Writer

An Author’s Dilemma

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Two years ago I wrote the story of my teen pregnancy. I attended a writer’s conference and submitted it for review by an agent.  The agent said the manuscript was well written, tight, and could see a great need in the marketplace. She offered the advice to “add the fleas on the dog” and make more of the scenes come alive. I took her advice and diligently revised and edited each and every scene to make sure as many as the five senses were covered, as possible. That process spanned an entire year.

After critiquing every chapter with a published author, I felt my memoir was ready for the publishing world. I submitted a query to the agent who had given me such positive feedback and held my breath. She was kind enough to get back to me within 24 hours, but said, “While you did make each scene come alive, as I suggested, I didn’t love the book.”

At first I felt crushed. But after a day or so, I decided not to let it get me down and queried several agents and publishing houses. All had the same response, “Not what we are looking for at this time.”

“What the hell are they looking for?” I thought a well-written, highly marketable book was exactly what publishers want.

After much nudging from friends, family, and other authors, I have decided to self-publish. CreateSpace was highly recommended by other self-publishers. A fickle publishing industry isn’t going to determine my publishing fate. I’ll leave that up to the marketplace and actual readers.

I will update the progress of my book release as the time gets nearer. Cross your fingers and wish me luck!

Life experiences

Labor Pains

Twenty-five years ago to date, I awoke at two in the morning to a strange tightening of my stomach.
“Indigestion.”
I rolled onto my side and fell back asleep. An hour later, that strange tightening awoke me again, only that time the pressure was definitely more intense. I was in labor!
Being a mere sixteen years old, I had never been so scared in my life. I spent the next three hours tossing and turning as my contractions got closer together and stronger in intensity. By six in the morning I thought I was dying.
I alerted my mom and sister of my labor. They frantically ran around like chickens with their heads cut off. Eventually we loaded into my sister’s minivan and headed for the hospital.
After an excruciating eighteen hours of labor, I gave birth to my beautiful daughter. I named her Lauren Paige.
Some people think I gave up a lot to raise her as a teen mom…maybe I did. But she was worth it. The knowledge and love that I gained from her far outweighed what I missed. So I didn’t attend my senior prom…big deal.
Happy birthday beautiful daughter! I wouldn’t change being your mother for the world.

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Life experiences

Introduction to The Caterpillar Girl

My name is Rebecca Carpenter. The fifth of nine children, I was born without any outward talents or inward self-esteem. Plain and quiet, I grew up believing that in order to be accepted, I needed boys to like me. And the only way to do that was to change my personality into a loud, flirtatious, fake.
But it wasn’t just the boys that I flirted with–fate was tempted until my actions caught up to me. Pregnant at the age of fifteen, my youth shattered into tiny pieces, never again to return.
My teen pregnancy became my wake up call. Like a jigsaw puzzle, I began the arduous task of constructing a new me. The process of figuring out who I was and where self-esteem really comes from became my new focus. And just like a caterpillar, I experienced my own metamorphosis. My plain outer shell transformed into a unique array of color, design, shape, and size.
But the greatest change occured on the inside. I realized that self-esteem originated from within me, not without. I learned to like myself, develop my hidden talents, and eventually even love myself. I don’t look in the mirror and see the most beautiful woman in the world, nor am I in love with myself. But I can view my reflection and be content with what I see and who I am.

I am a Caterpillar Girl.dreamstime_s_24918723.jpg